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Bipolar Hall-effect digital position sensors

13 October 2009

Honeywell has further expanded its Hall-effect sensor portfolio with the introduction of the SS311PT and SS411P bipolar Hall-effect digital position sensors. These devices differ from Honeywell's existing digital Hall-effect sensors in that they have a built-in pull-up resistor and a low 2.7 Vdc voltage capability - the lowest rating in Honeywell's digital Hall-effect sensor portfolio.

Bipolar Hall-effect digital position sensors
Bipolar Hall-effect digital position sensors

Honeywell has further expanded its Hall-effect sensor portfolio with the introduction of the SS311PT and SS411P bipolar Hall-effect digital position sensors. These devices differ from Honeywell's existing digital Hall-effect sensors in that they have a built-in pull-up resistor and a low 2.7 Vdc voltage capability - the lowest rating in Honeywell's digital Hall-effect sensor portfolio.
The built-in pull-up resistor can easily interface with common electronic circuits and eliminates the need for the customer to purchase an external pull-up resistor, reducing the total system cost. The sensor's integrated circuit has been downsized, saving on manufacturing costs while still meeting customer requirements. These manufacturing cost savings result in lower costs to customers. The low 2.7 Vdc to 7 Vdc low supply voltage range allows for use in a variety of applications.
The SS311PT subminiature SOT-23 surface-mount package is supplied on tape and reel for automated pick and place assembly. The SS411P's leaded, flat TO-92 package allows for extra space on the printed circuit board. These small, versatile Hall-effect devices are operated by the magnetic field from a permanent magnet or an electromagnet. They respond to alternating North and South poles. Both sensors feature enhanced sensitivity which allows for the use of smaller, often less expensive magnets.


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